Special Report: New York Post Misses Point Again

2 Comments

In an attempt to elicit sympathy for Irvin Khaytham’s “plight,” the Post shows its total lack of awareness. Here’s the summing up:

Irvin Khaytman, 17, was on the N train in Brooklyn about 2 a.m. when he was abruptly stopped by a police officer on the platform.
“He said he saw my feet on the edge of the seat next to me,” Khaytman said. “He said putting your feet on a seat is nasty, and since I was nasty, I deserved a ticket.” Seems the subways are so safe that police are still busy hunting down early-morning riders who put their feet up on seats or — heaven forbid!– cross their legs

To address both points:

1) Yeah, putting your feet up on the seat next to you IS nasty.  How the hell do I know where you’ve been?  You could’ve been visiting the local dog shit factory for all I know! [Incidentally, if you haven't yet visited the local dog shit factory, it's a real treat, and they could really use the business these days.]

2) Putting your filthy, disgusting feet on the seat of the person who will eventually sit there is NOT the same as crossing your legs.

I see where the Post is trying to go with this.  They are trying to make it seem as if the police are bringing about the return of The Crusades with their petty excuse for offenses, but they completely miss the point.  Potentially harming yourself by changing trains while they’re in motion doesn’t hurt others (alright, unless you fall on the tracks, in which case you are gumming up the works a bit) and therefore IS a petty offense.  See the difference?

- Oh, sit! $50 for feet on a seat [New York Post]

Tags:

2 Responses to “Special Report: New York Post Misses Point Again”

  1. 2
    gene Says:

    Hey, I think you’re onto something. Perhaps I was a bit too hasty in condemning the boy. Perhaps he was the victim after all.

  2. 1
    blind willie c Says:

    I think the boy clearly missed the subtle deftness in what was clearly a pick-up line from the former cop in The Village People. C’mon on…the N? “Nasty must be punished” Does a stone-wall have to fall people these days?

Leave a Reply